What Causes Protein Buildup on Contacts and How to Prevent It

What Causes Protein Buildup on Contacts and Related Complications

The eyes’ natural production of tears triggers protein build-up on your contact lenses. Though it is not always harmful in the short-term for a build-up to build up, you need to make sure that additional protein is getting frequently wiped for a range of health factors.

First, build-up on your contact lenses can hinder your vision. Second, if the build-up is not cleaned off routinely, it can ruin your lenses ability to keep moisture and filter oxygen appropriately. In other words, excess protein build-up on your contact lenses makes them tough to see through and uneasy to use.

These solutions often come with a special case for you to place your lenses in while you clean them.

These solutions often come with a special case for you to place your lenses in while you clean them.

Protein buildup is a common issue with soft and tough contact lenses. Buildup can usually be seen in the white or cloudy marks on the surface area of the contact lens, which causes blurred vision and discomfort. With appropriate care and usage of contact lenses, protein buildup can be controlled.

How to Prevent

Actively Cleanse Contacts With Saline Solution

Even though most soft contact solutions promote a no-rub formula, contacts that are vulnerable to protein buildup need active rubbing. After eliminating each contact lens, place it in the palm of your hand and fill it will a saline option purchased specially for lenses. Rub the contact lens on each side for five to 10 seconds and place it in a contact lens case with fresh saline service. When cleaning up the lenses before insertion, likewise use fresh service.

Usage Eyedrops Daily

Eyedrops are not exclusively for remoisturizing contacts; they are also used to clean them during daily use. Eyedrops produced contact lenses get rid of protein buildup and keep your lenses hygienic through extended usage.

Change Contacts Regularly

Most soft contact lenses are recommended for every day, biweekly or monthly use. For lens users having continuous and repeated difficulty with protein deposits, daily lenses may be a solution. Before altering your contact brand, however, guarantee you are adhering to suggested use time frames. The longer lenses are utilized, the higher the danger of protein buildup and infections to the cornea, which can completely harm eye tissue.

If your contact lenses do not seem as clear as they utilized to be, or if you're experiencing the symptoms of protein build-up (like dry or red eyes), talk with your eye doctor about switching to everyday lenses.

If your contact lenses do not seem as clear as they utilized to be, or if you’re experiencing the symptoms of protein build-up (like dry or red eyes), talk with your eye doctor about switching to everyday lenses.

Consider Hydrogen Solutions

For those still not seeing the complete results of saline solution, hydrogen solutions are offered to provide a more extensive cleanse. These products provide a specialty case that includes a platinum finishing, assisting in breaking down the hydrogen particles so you can then place the contacts in your eyes without burning them. This active clean requirements to occur over a minimum of six hours, according to the majority of producers, however, it offers a micro-filtered convenience level not found with saline solutions.

Eliminate Potential Debris

Makeup and hair items can fall into the eye and coat the contact lens with a substance that may trigger blurry vision or enable the protein to accumulate quicker. To minimize this danger, apply makeup and hair item before lenses are placed. Because hairspray may remain in the air longer, spray it in a various space than you will be placing your contacts. After removing your contacts, clean all makeup off thoroughly so that particles do not gather in the creases of the eye overnight.

Updated: October 31, 2018 — 4:10 am

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